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do. >> last month, epa administrator gina mccarthy testified before the house science committee on the agencies will science and technology activities. the committee examine the policy of transparency practices on clean air and water acts and hydraulic fracturing or cracking. we bring you that kerry now. i'm not [inaudible conversations] >> to commit inside space and technology will come to order. welcome, everyone to today's hearing entitled strengthening transparency and accountability within the environmental protection agency. we're going to recognize myself or fitness for a doping statement and then i'll recognize the ranking member for hers. the environmental protection agency like every other governmental institution should answer to the american people. everyone agrees we need to protect the environment, but we should do so in a way that is open and honest. democracy requires transparency and accountability. yet epa's justification for regulation are cloaked in secrecy i asked. it appears the epa been a lot of stretches of science to justify its own object disappeared am
that we understand how to answer those issues effective from a science perspective, and in a way that continues to maintain the availability of inexpensive natural gas that strengths the economy as well as help us reduce air emission. >> i appreciate that. i think it seems like a reasonable response. someone who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to the individual -- because
science in the world. we want to understand how life works at the detailed levels and apply that in terms of coming up with new insights to prevent and treat disease. >> we support tens of thousands of grants across the country conducted by the world's most cutting-edge scientist in the united states who are working on cancer, aids and other drugs. we are on a roll but there is a bit of an issue with the cuts. >> let's learn about the history. your roots date back to the late 1700s. but you were formed in 1887 as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? >> the current budget is about $29 billion. the number of people that work on the campus is about 17,000. most of the work is done by grants we give to the institutions across the country and globally. 85% is spent there in the universities where you are hearing about medical breakthroughs. >> how long have you been with nih? >> i came here 20 years ago, steve. asked to come lead the human genome project. in 2003, they laid out all three letters of the dna instruction book w
in "the war on football" is i get the signs and i try to overcome the speculation with the science on the game and the stories behind the game. and the reality is that the perception that's been created by the mass media with football over the last two years is almost in every instance wrong. in some cases just 180° wrong. i got into this genesis of writing "the war on football" was a study that was put together by the national institutes for occupational safety and health. national institutes ofnational f occupational safety and health federal scientist. they put together last year, they looked at every nfl player who was pension vested who played in the league between 1959-1980. so guys like lawrence taylor and joe theismann and walter payton and dick butkus, all these guys, about 35 other players who played in the league in those 30 or so years. the reason they looked at these players is because there's a wide suspicion in the public that nfl players die young, that they died in the '50s, that the game takes such a toll on their bodies that their health outcomes are just absolu
research in the world. basicssion is to do science to understand how life works at the most detailed level and to apply that in terms of coming up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists in the u.s. who are working on things from cancer to hiv, two aides. you name it -- to aids. you name it. let's learn more about the history. your roots date back to the late of thebut you are part department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? guest: it is about $29 billion. the number of people who work about on the campus is 17,000. most of our work is done by the grants that we give to universities and institutions all over the country. not getur money does spent in bethesda, but gets spent in those great universities where you are hearing every day about medical breakthroughs. that is because nih supported the work. how long have you been at nih? guest: 20 years ago is when i got here. we were working on the human genome project. p
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the deal creating the world's largest airline became official today. american airlines emerged from bankruptcy to join with u.s. airways. the new carrier will operate under the american airlines name. the merger leaves four airlines controlling more than 80% of the american travel market. passengers won't see immediate changes to reservations or frequent flyer programs, and it remains unclear if the deal will mean higher fares. eight of the most prominent u.s. tech companies, including apple, google and facebook, are calling for tighter controls on government surveillance. they sent an open letter to president obama today, in the wake of revelationshat the go
labs. andft the area of research am now pursuing a career in science policy. i am working with a public education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a histori
. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hardcore nerds. lindsey miran is a cia operative and analyst. tonight, high tech crime stoppers. shots fired in the night. cops pinpoint the crime scene. how do they do it? the new science of solving crime. crystal dilworth is a scientist. if you think wine making is old school, think good. the newest ways of making wine. >> a neuro scientist and i will phil tores, an entimologist. the by onic arm. see how it's more man-like than machine. that's our team. now, let's do some science. >> hey, guys, welcome to techknow where we bring you stories of innovation here in america. i am phil torres. i am here with michelle, crystal and lindsey. you went to one of the most violent cities in america to see how technology can help us fight crime? >> that's right. i went to oakland, california which has the 5th highest crime rate and nearby richmond which is among the top 20 to look at some very innovative technology that they are looking to increase the eyes and ears of the police force on the street. so let's have a look these are st
no further than shanghai. that chinese city has ranked top in math, reading, and science among teenagers. a new global report says that east asian schools are at the top of academic excellence by tackling tough classrooms and abandoning rote learning. things were not so good for students in the united states. a 15-year-old there jailed in math and were average for reading and science. france is above average in reading and writing but has reading and math, now in 20 fifth place. we leave you with that. you are watching "france 24." >> i am joined on the set by mrs. rush -- -- what is making headlines this morning? >> we start with syria and the question of bashar al-assad. i will go straight away the independent newspaper in the u.k.. bashar al-plicated assad in war crimes. you can see the piece there. the u.n. is keeping full lists of suspected war criminals. the evidence -- until the evidence is requested for an incredible -- four a credible investigation. more broadly on the situation seery, it is a story not being covered as much as usual compared to the events on the ground. when th
the science of space and technology committee in the house criticized roles the epa said on the amount of carbon pollution new power plants were allowed to remain. this is the epa is way too slow or reverse the effects of climate change. a letter addressed to the head of the agency. lamar smith wrote the agency is a stubborn insistence on placing its judgment of biomass of that science advisers raises serious concerns that the apa is a roll making is based more on partisan politics and sound science but on wednesday a job for the stars with a two hour long hearing called astral biology the search for bio signatures in our solar system and the lines. this guy saying that is possibly just about life on other planets aren't possibility of june more than you the pope refused. what can we find hope and pray the atmosphere to the french who drive by of signatures that would indicate the presence of some form of gluten free life. what would be the implications of such a discovery. pics are now questioning the lamar smith concedes aliens as sound science but quiet change and partisan politics
been credited with new breakthroughs in the study of medical science, including aids and mental health. this morning on the "washington journal" we want to focus on the nih and give you an opportunity to find out more about the agency. francis s. collins joins us live. >> it is great to be here. >> you are the director of the nih. what is your objective? guest: we are the largest searcher -- researcher in the world. we focus on how life works at the most detailed level, and partly to apply that and come up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. we support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists who are working from everything from cancer, to hiv-aids, two timers -- o all alzheimer's. you name it. we want to talk more about that, in terms of sequestration. you form to this as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget? how many people work for the and age? billion.9 the number of people who work for us focus on the work that we do from the grants that we give across the country, a
and i in love not only with the concept of discovery and science that has to do with health but the extraordinary electricity of atmosphere here at the nih. new york for a year to complete the training as a en came back here senior scientist and have been here ever since. place.n extraordinary and diversity and interaction and communication is sometimes jokewe around but it isn't a joke. i would do it for nothing if i opportunity. it's such an exciting experience. appreciate the chance to talk to you and other experts on show our audience going there. this past week president talking aids aids as part of world day and another $1 million in aids resoeufplt here's what the had to saeufplt i want your reaction afterwards. announcedd aids day i drug llion for the aids assistance program which help people pay for life saving medications. was so ime the need great that over 9,000 people were on the wait list. vowed to get those numbers down. as of last week we have cleared the wait list. to zero and we'll it back.ing to get [applause] so we're making progress. we we're all here to
. center for science in the public interest is doing that, but nothing has happened so far. legislation has a very long on- ramp. it takes a long time to make anybody do anything in congress. and part of that is due to corporate lobbying. other strategies, so far nothing. how about the farm bill? price subsidies create market distortion. it would be much better to get rid of all the subsidies and let every foodstuff reach it's appropriate market capitalization. that would work nicely. the problem is, the food industry would have a cow. the question is -- is that ok? is it ok for the food industry to have a cow? i think it is. finally, legal actions. this is the statement that got me to law school. the hyderabad statement. from an indian public health for. all significant advances in public health require and involve the use of law. when i heard that, i went, yes. that is exactly right. and that is why i came to hastings to get my masters. much shorter on-ramp. you can actually make something happen. you can do regulation through litigation. it is the most bang for your buck if you have cour
a decade or two of really getting the kind of science we needed to make that case and to understand the brain as being the basis of both normal and abnormal behavior. host: the president talking about the brain initiative, calling this the next major american project -- what is he talking about? guest: to put that into context, he was thinking about the last two great american projects in science. one was the apollo project to put a man on the moon. and then the human genome project. the next great american project is what he is calling the brain initiative. and that is an initiative that will involve several government agencies, among them nih and the defense advanced research project agency and the national science foundation as well as private partners to take our understanding of the brain and how it works and bring it up a notch. try to figure out a way to develop the tools to decode the language of the brain. we have gone a long way recently, but we knew -- need to go much further much faster to understand the basis of how the brain works and how it sometimes does not work so
. this isn't rocket science. web application development is a proven science. companies do it all the time. >> luke, i asked you and you said for a million bucks you could do it. >> right. the user interface is just the automation of a 12-page paper form. that's a slam dunk for any web development company. easy, straightforward. the back end stuff, more complicated but very doable. this doesn't need to be a silicon valley space project. this is braead and butter. >> how much? >> under a million for the front end. >> total, start to finish. >> i would agree with mr. kennedy in the $5 million to $10 million range. >> we spent hundreds of millions. we may go up to a billion on this stupid thing. it's still screwed up. >> yeah. >> none of the contractors are ever held accountable for delivering crap. >> it's crap. >>le talking with martin bosh earlier, another hacker. amazing the type of security you can build. nothing rocket science. you can do it. >> people think this is bad? think of the health care. beside it is cancellations forced into the plan, you can't keep your doctor the. you're pay
journalistic science lacks reliable reference. of both popular and high literary culture to be the tumultuous commissioned of the virgin and modes of thought in the in antebellum period a and choreographed the three stretches completely. rather than read the the high renaissance to read those as burst by wide popular writing immediately with the perceived reality the results with the political point of view to reanimate the of the blind alley. and then the first instance with the social engagement of the practice but he does so while incorporating and modified critical forms. john browne did jacksonian america did each marked with the hard work of three big it always a pleasure to engage david on the page and each book richly informs the sense of their subjects collectively and david i am grateful for your work and a remarkable career that continues with undiminished vigor. thank you very much and i apologize for my departure. [applause] >> first things first congratulations i think the more remarkable thing that is beneath the amazon since it is 25 years ago you cannot have the willingness t
in reading, 17th in science, 25th in math. 34 nations. we're a better nation than that. to compete and remain internationally globally competitive, we have to change and we haven system to address the needs of our employers. it up to you open guys, but before we do that, manziel y, is johnny going to win the heisman again? >> i don't have a clue. i played six-man football. >> you're an aggie, you're yeah, baby, yeah. >> i don't have an idea. he is fun to watch play. here's what i will project. i will make a prediction -- that i'm very confident in and that is that texas a&m will beat the lsu this weekend in football. >> all right. lsu fans out here. >> bring that on, bobby jindal. >> come on, bobby. come on. >> let's open it up for questions. >> going to beat baylor. >> lsu -- >> we have a microphone? hand held microphone? okay, shout it out. >> that could be good. that could be good. >> can i ask the first question? first question. >> thank you. > what governor kasich said, not to say anything away from education. you did gloss over a little bit joe's fairness. asking about specifically taxe
on the leading, math and science scores of children around the world. where does the united states rank? stick around. bill: why the nfl will not air this commercial. >> for my family's safety is my highest priority. i am responsible for their protection. in the nation, we know how you feel about your car. so when coverage really counts, count on nationwide insurance. because what's precious to you is precious to us. ♪ love, love is strange just another way we put members first. because we don't have shareholders. join the nation. ♪ baby... ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ bill: disgusting, risque, but the nfl drawing the line when it comes to this spot. >> aim responsible for their protection. and no one has the right to tell me how to defend them. so i have chosen the most effective tool. bill: that spot is defending second amendment rights for the big game. super bowl ad or not, it's getting a lot of attention. it's gone viral online already. martha: disappointing news about america's education system. according to the latest survey when it comes to major subjects like math, reading a
courage and enormous strength as well as he challenged us all to not just acknowledge the science of climate change, do understand that it is real and happening, but to also charge the cabinet to take immediate action. call me biased, but i believe it was his best speeches so far, although he is not done yet, i'm quite sure. climated through his action plan as well, which outlined some common sense, pragmatic steps that the epa and other agencies across the toinistration are now taking cut carbon pollution, invest in clean energy, to help our cities and towns build in more resilient ways so that they can add depth to a changing climate and keep our communities safe, but also to prepare to be a broader and more vocal leader on the issue of climate change in international discussions. as you know, in september, epa proposed urban pollution standards for new power plants using our authority that congress gave us under the clean air act. those power plant labor --ations our proposals regulations are proposals that would impact new facilities being constructed. new would ensure any fac
developments, in developments that include both science as well as the legal profession helping to decide which of these developments are great and how how can we best use them? one of the things i really enjoy about talking to groups of judges is that you have, this group has the collective wisdom to help figure out how we can use this information, use this information to its best possible purposes and of course to avoid any potential harmful outcomes so i would like to thank you for your attention this morning. i've a happy to address any questions. [applause] >> we have time for two or three questions. please come up to the microphones to the front and remember you will be immortalized on c-span. >> taking swabs and telling what your future medical problems are. how accurate are those predictions and is it worth the money? >> that is a great question. the question is about so-called direct consumer testing where you send a saliva sample into a company. they type your dna using what we call a dna chip and you get back a lot of information about your approximate ancestry and about your risk fo
really interesting. >> case law in there. unbelievable. >> they've got the science. >> i wish i could talk more about this. we will, we'll watch there case carefully. danny and joey, flat out of time. bye. have a great day. >> thank you, everyone for watching. around the world starts right now. >>> this is "around the world." i'm fredricka whitfield. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. now, we're going to talk a little bit about the train crash in new york. there have been developments. >> that's right. a deadly train crash taking place just days ago. and now we understand that the train engineer is talking and saying that he may have been in a days, quote unquote, just prior to that train derailing. let's go to washington and rene marsh for more on that. rene? >> freed and michael, we are learning more information about what happened in the moments before that speeding train jumped the tracks in the bronx. two senior law enforcement sources tell cnn producer that the train's engineer, william rockefeller, told investigators on the scene he was dazed in the mom
from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as other countries which are currently doing better on disadvantaged schools. in other countries doing bett
parents did, to pursue careers in medicine, science, education. many are proud business owners of law firms, restaurants, grocery stores, shipping companies and hair braiding venues. there are those who have come as asylum seekers, feeling war, famine and again side. they come to the united states to become productive tax paying members of our society. and like the other immigrant groups, immigrants are dealing with the back logged immigration processing, families being ripped apart, falling out of status because they were eeked out. racial and status discrimination, felony laws that prohibit judicial review, deportation processes that violate human rights and prohibitive student visa programs limited access to work permits and much, much more. mr. speaker, it is imperative for us to acknowledge the fact that many immigrants arrive on our shores during a time in their lives when they are most productive. the most productive years in their lives. bringing them to the floor would deny us as a nation the opportunity to access their talent, their skill and abilities in the prime of their
. men or women's brains. what about handling stress? which gend accident occur that better? the science -- which gender does that better? the science is in so stay tuned for that. ♪ ♪ i ied depend last weekend. ♪ it really made the difference between a morning around the house and getting a little exercise. unlike the bargain brand, depend gives you new fit-flex®, our best protection. it's a smooth and comfortable fit with more lycra strands. get your free sample at depend.com. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen tthem. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> good morning. it's friday, december 6. i'm elisabeth hasselbeck. this morning the world's mourning the loss of an icon. reaction to the passing of nelson mandela live from south africa. >>> and we now know the president's promise. you can keep your health care if you like it. it wasn't exactly true. we thought it was plowed ground. the
the simulation center, which is opening in january. >> sure. the simulation center is part of our health sciences complex where you look at where medicine is going. we are trying to really force all of the education around medicine to be patient centric and make everyone realize you need a team approach. that also involves looking at using technology, to teach people how to do things. the way i was trained where i had to do one and then observe one, do one and teach one. we now have simulation for everything. unbelievable in terms of the technology. whoa have a mannequin who will deliver baby, et cetera. so it's extremely high tech. and that summation center, in my opinion, would be best in the midatlantic area when we open it in january. >> that sounds fascinating. >> absolutely. >> a mannequin delivering a baby? >> that's absolutely right. >> physical plant, new dorms, new buildings going up. >> that's right. two new residence halls are going up. atmosphere on the campus and keep as many of our students on the campus. it helps with student life. that's going on. i think again it will be a state
and compare performances in reading, math and science. results from 2012 were released today, and, once again, the u.s. hovered near the middle of the pack, lagging in some areas even as other countries advanced. math remains the biggest challenge. 29 other systems had higher average scores than american high schoolers. the u.s. fared better in reading, where it ranked 20th, and in science, ranking 23rd. the best results were in east asia, where students from shanghai, singapore, south korea and japan, among others, placed near the top. pisa results also showed another concern for american teens as well: a smaller percentage of them reached the top levels of proficiency. as in the past, though, some education experts questioned just what and how much pisa tells us, given social, cultural and economic differences among nations. the pisa test is coordinated by the organization for economic cooperation and development, the o.e.c.d. andreas schleicher serves as deputy director for education and skills there. he helped develop and runs the tests, and joins us now. >> so explain to us first, what i
. that would include things like infrastructure, education, r&d. >> rose: science exploration. >> rose: and we spent about 30% on transfer payments to the elderly. >> we now spend 68% on transfer payments but investments are down to 15%. so i think to larry's point, what did we get out of the investment? well, we got the internet. we got g.p.s., we got the human genome. >> rose: so that's where you agree with him. >> i totally agree. and if you look at the sequester -- >> rose: that the investments are worthwhile and important and crucial to our future. >> yes, but we are cutting the investments so we can continue to let transfer payments to the elderly grow at a very rapid rate. we cannot do both. >> rose: or we're cutting the investments because we do not have a realistic look at where taxes-- which you're prepared to have a real itselfic look at. yes? in other words, you're not coming here as a representative a view often expressed by the 30 members of congress, although you had reservations about the health fund, defunding the health care even though you expressed riz reservations about it
. >> absolutely. absolutely. the science shows that the way we change behavior is by working together in groups. that's what the science shows, for all sorts of conditions, diabetes and so forth. so the daniel plan, we had 12,000 people lose a quarter of a million pounds in a year and they did it together. those who did it together lost twice as much weight as those who did it alone and got twice as healthy. it wasn't a weight loss program. it was about the science of creating health. the weight loss was a side effect. they supported each other, they helped each other, they cooked together, they shopped together, they exercised together. they were there when they had issues and troubles and struggles to support each other and get back on track. that's the power of community. the community was the medicine. >> i know you want people to get the book, but how does this relate to daniel from the bible? >> well, daniel was a young jewish leader who, during the captivity of the jewish nation taken to babylon, he was being tutored by the babylonian king and one of the perks of being in the king's hous
a gun out of plastic. it was science fiction but in the last few years that science fiction has become a reality. 3-d printers, a technology overall that is miraculous. 3-d printers can create car parts at a much cheaper price, create a trachea for a baby so it can live. but they can also create plastic guns. and now technology allows them to be sold for $1,000, a little more than $1,000, so just about anyone can get one; certainly a terrorist intent on doing evil. so the ban takes on new urgency, and today there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the house of representatives has passed a bill to extend that ban for ten years. the bad news is the dangerous loophole i mentioned is still in the bill. under existing law, the law that expires tonight, you can make one of these undetectable guns perfectly legal by simply attaching a removable piece of metal to the handle, and then you could have the gun, have it be legal at the last moment when you wanted to slip it somewhere where it could be very dangerous, you remove the metal part and make the gun invisible to the metal det
. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace
developing a nuclear weapon. >> the media in the u.s. christia"christian science moni" or bloomberg has changed direction at all. emphasizing that the u.s. intelligence, the israeli intelligence has concluded that iran has not made the decision to acquire nuclear weapons. you never hear mention the fact that iran's nuclear facilities are the most inspected in the world. >> this whole story has been a mind field, and we've watched it ebb and flow and it's been ridiculous some of the reporting that really takes us back ten years to just before the invasion of iraq where we had this entire narrative that was put forward often in the media, especially in the "new york times" it was coming from the bush administration about how basically how evil iraq was. >> states likes these and their terrorist allies constitute an access of evil. >> how it's cheating all the time on its clear ways for weapons of mass destruction. we've seen episodes of this in the last several years with iran. >> but a lot of outlets, "the new york times" have taken a lot of pains to not make the same mistakes that they
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
laughs. we'll look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace
into the vehicle. i know this looks like science fiction, it's not. >> unveiled its experiment &tall delivery drones. prime air. amazon hopes within the next four to five years, to deliver up to five pound packages in a half hour to anywhere within ten miles of a warehouse. >> these are -- you give them instructions of which gps cured cured that gpscoordinants. we have been unable to really use it. both because of legal restrictions and because of d.c.'s no fly zone. amazon would have to deal with the faa's drone restrictions and then there are questions about safety. >> imagine one of those 5- pound packages dropping right on your head. and then there are questions of privacy. imagine a drone flying over your head looking in your windows. aviation experts say it is doable and the faa tells me it is committed to the safe, efficient, and timely integration of unmanned aircraft into the nation's air space. but it is not allowed now and it will likely be 2015 before the faa even issues rigs. so you can't put off ordering aunt mildred's presents until christmas eve this year, wusa9. >> fedex
's they invest in basic science and they investment 90 in our security. there's a whole bunch of things be like infrastructure and skills where the city's and the metropolitan areas and the states today before we even see he skis down are really carrying the lions share of the investment so the federal government needs to doless better. i think the challenge we're going to have and this is really your question greg is we're going to have spatialal uneven growth because this is a powerful and prosperous economy you've made the hard bargain positions in the city you've south yourself up to grow even, you know, more and better jobs and bring in the youth that you're describing. now can detroit do that. i think that michigan is seeing on enormous rebound and the question for them is now how to gave me a city 1 hundred and 38 square miles in detroit how to engage the city of detroit in that rebound. but look it is what it is okay. we can try to wish a different kind of national government on the next year or 3 years of 10 years it's not going to happen. in the going to happen. cities and metropolita
the perception. they plan to use flying robots to deliver packages faster. >> it may look like science fiction. amazon says package delivers via drones could be five years away. the ayounnnouncement from the c coming hours before cyber monday. domminos pizza put out this video. amazon is serious. this tech writer believes them. >> you have to think about the scale of amazon, if they deploy this technology, they'll do it on a high scale. the technology advances at amazon, and if the faa puts the infrastructure in place, i don't see why it wouldn't. >> an order is boxed in a warehouse, attached to the drone and sent to the delivery address. 5 pounds much weight is allowed. one of the technical issues. >> how do we make them safe, that they can't be hacked and will not fall out of the sky or run into something. >> provided that is ironed out privacy concerns will prop up. it should have a plan that is riggerous. it should articulate to the federal aviation body. >> folks took to twitter to comment. many made light of it. jim priest writes: there's also a parody twitter address for amazon saying:
, its ranking has dropped in all three subjects now placing 26th in math, 21st in science, and 17th in reading. >> we're running in place as other high-performing countries start to lap us. >> reporter: some of those ranking ahead of the united states are china, canada, germany, poland and latvia, even developing countries like vietnam. >> asian countries like korea, like japan, like taiwan, and now like vietnam which are doing extraordinarily well because they make it very clear to their students in high school just exactly how important education is. >> reporter: we saw that firsthand on a recent visit to shanghai. why do you want to study so much? >> because i want to have a better future. and do some contribution to our society. >> reporter: but some argue the low rankings reflect what they call america's emphasis on testing, the diverse population, and others cite poverty as a factor. america has a child poverty rate nearly double that of countries like canada and germany who out-perform the united states. today's results are a sobering reminder that for america, an economic su
is weak. it is not an exact science. >> you need to understand that in is a radio frequency and this is really mountainous terrains so the signal can bounce off complicating an identification of that location. if the family survives the crash, they have had to survive two nights in frigid winter weather. >> this morning, it was very cold. it was down well below zero last night at johnson street airport and snow is on the ground, and we 2.5' to 3' of snow and valley forge has pilot. >> dale smith a software pioneer reported engine problems. onboard his daughter, amber and her fiance, both students at byu idaho. jonathan was meeting her family over thanksgiving. his uncle has this to say. >> they were deeply in love scheduled to be married january 46789. >> also, his son daniel and daniel's wife were on the plane, five members of a loving family. missing. >> the skies are career so that is good. rescue teams hope to search until dark but scattered forecast this afternoon could interfere with the efforts. in the newsroom no abc7 news. >> the autopsy results are out this morning
science monitor. walden,esentative greg on to make haitians and technology. communications and technology. >> a several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. treasury secretary jack lew will be at the future will trust to discuss the state of financial reform. also on c-span2, members of the house and energy commerce subcommittee on energy and power will hear from energy regulatory commissioners. span330 eastern a.m. on c- we cover a hearing on unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month. >> from age eight, betty ford, then betty [inaudible] put on skits and plays and that led to eddington, vermont where she studied at the school of dance. these are some of her notecards. no bookstworks -- where she kept cards. she carried this with her to vermont, back to grand rapids, off to new york where she studied with martha graham and work with the powers modeling agency and back to grand rapids again. you will find a host of things that you would find in just about any organizer. brochures on dance costumes, one of her sketches of a costume for one of the dance
there. night is a stem huge success. trying to pique the interest in science and technology and map. getting to our forecast, today, dry and cold. snow early on in the morning on sunday. a little accumulation and changing to sleep. we will have the latest of 5:00. [dramatic music] ♪ >> hey. what's up, buddy? what up? what up? what up? what up? what up? what up? [speaking indistinctly] how are you? what's up, chaan? >> how you doing? >> yeah, man. good. yeah. [cheers and applause] yeah. hello, and welcome to millionaire. we are having a blast this week giving deserving people lots of cash, and you know what? it's still double money week, y'all. yeah. [cheers and applause] contestants get double the cash
by science. they'll only offer information on your ancestry. >>> the owner of john's grill donated $20,000 to buy the devices. he said, he hopes it will save lives. the police chief thanked him at his restaurant this morning. he says the devices are an important edition to the patrol cars because police officers are the first on the scene in an emergency. and in cardiac arrest, every second counts. >>> delays at san jose international airport. that story is next. >>> if you think it's crazy around here, ice and snow are making travel impossible for parts of the south and midwest. several deaths have been reported most of those from crashes on the roads. more than 250,000 people are without power now. the marathon in dallas that was scheduled for tomorrow has been cancelled. at least ten dallas flights two and from san jose international airport were cancelled. the same storm is now headed to the northeast. it does make it look not quite so cold around here. >> a few snow flurries already in los gatos. that storm was part of the same cold air we've been dealing with this past week. the
of all, change. >> engineering doesn't have to be this incredibly intimidating math science thing. we can show girls engineering changes people's lives and it can help make the world a better place. >> sterling says goldie blocks is making money but not ready to say how much and it's one of four finalist for a contest to win a free super bowl commercial worth close to $4 million. that announcement is due in late january. we'll fill you in when we get it. >> play with the dolls and become an engineer and do great things for the country. >> absolutely. >> we can use more women like that. >> that's "nightly business report" for tonight. we want to remind you, this is the time of year your public television needs your support to make shows like this possible. >> i'm tyler mathisen. thanks for your support. have a great weekend, everybody. see you back here on monday. >>> night by business report has been brought to you in part by. >> thestreet.com, up to the minute stock market news and in depth analysis. our quant rating service prov e provides objective independent ratings daily on over 43
terrestrial landing map en route to the moon. it's being haled as a major milestone to the science program. china will send someone to the moon in 2020 now that we can no longer send someone to the moon. >> we know what's there. we're worried about what they want to use it for at this point. what is this jade thing, it drives around? >> yeah, like a buggy that will go around and check out the surface. >> maybe if it drives everywhere it could find a moon rock more interesting than what we've got. if they could cover the whole rock, the whole satellite. >> maybe they're going to deliver packages. >> maybe they're going to do that. >> deliver amazon packages to the moon. >> i love the moon, it's beautiful. it makes you feel nice, but i'm done with the moon. we need to go somewhere else to make it interesting. >> one of these 40 billion earth like planets that are supposed to be out there nerds, listen up. the largest known private memorabilia collection from the "lord of the rings" collection will be released this week. there will also be props used by the evil ring reichs, prosthetic hobbit
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